Archive for the ‘History’ Category

When Don McLean’s “American Pie” was dominating the airwaves 40 years ago, we youngsters got a kick out of rhyming “Chevy” with “levee” more than trying to decipher deeper meanings.

At the time, I might have heard of Buddy Holly, but my first encounter with the Big Bopper wasn’t until “Chantilly Lace” appeared on the “American Graffiti” soundtrack the following year. And I’m not so sure about Richie Valens.

At any rate, “American Pie” kind of chronicles the state of rock ‘n’ roll from the airplane crash of Feb. 3, 1959, through the end of the ’60s. Despite urban legend, the song title is not the name of the plane.

My main question about the tragedy: Why were they flying around the Midwest in the dead of winter? Aviation wasn’t all that advanced 53 years ago, and when that plane – it was a Beechcraft Bonanza, with no specific appellation – took off from Clear Lake, Iowa, it didn’t travel too far before killing everyone on board.

In remembrance of the three musicians who were among the toll, here are a few nuggets pertaining to their careers and “the day the music died”:

  • Waylon Jennings, who was a member of Holly’s backing band the Crickets at the time, gave up his seat on behalf of the Bopper. (Waylon did die in February, but 43 years later.)
  • Tommy Allsup, another Cricket, flipped a coin with Valens to determine who would fly. Allsup lost. And won. He still is with us, at age 80.
  • Charles Hardin Holley (sic) was only 22 years old at the time but already had established himself as a premiere performer-songwriter in the nascent world of rock ‘n’ roll. His death was part of a series of events – the drafting of Elvis, the “retirement” of Little Richard, the cousin-marrying scandal of Jerry Lee Lewis and the jailing of Chuck Berry – that threatened to derail the new type of music.
  • A group of guys from Liverpool, UK, decided it would be cool to name their band after an insect, in the fashion of the Crickets. They didn’t decide on “Beetles,” though.
  • Holly’s “Not Fade Away” was the first American hit by a band named after a Muddy Waters song, the Rolling Stones. It later was played more than 550 times by a band that got its name from the dictionary, the Grateful Dead.
  • Richie Valens’ last name actually was Valenzuela. No word on whether he was related to baseball pitcher Fernando, but Richard Steven had yet to reach his 18th birthday when he died.
  • The Big Bopper’s name was was Jiles Perry Richardson, and he was a ripe old 28 at the time. He wrote the novelty song “Running Bear,” which to the best of my knowledge still is recorded to this day.
  • Dion DiMucci, who also was part of the Winter Dance Party package tour with his band the Belmonts, recalled in a 2009 interview: “I remember just sitting there alone on the bus, and Buddy’s guitar was on the back seat, Ritchie’s outfit was hanging from the luggage rack … There was the Big Bopper’s hat, just sitting there.”
  • Buddy’s pregnant wife, Maria, miscarried soon after the wreck, ending that part of the Holly family tree.
  • Robert Zimmerman of Hibbing, Minn., attended a Winter Dance Party show on Jan. 31, 1959. Forty years later, as Bob Dylan accepting a Grammy, he recalled about Holly: I was three feet away from him…and he LOOKED at me. And I just have some sort of feeling that he was — I don’t know how or why — but I know he was with us all the time we were making this record in some kind of way.”
  • Buddy Holly had a single on the charts at the time of his death. It reached No. 13 in the United States and No. 1 in the United Kingdom. Its title: “It Doesn’t Matter Anymore.”
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Let’s hop into the time machine and visit the Pittsburgh Pirates as they prepare for Spring Training 1992.

The Pirates have come off two straight division championships are looking to do so again. Despite losing All-Star Bobby Bonilla to free agency, the team looks to have a solid lineup:

  • Catcher: Mike LaValliere. Spanky provided consistency behind the plate in 1991 while hitting .289.
  • First Base: Orlando Merced. His .275 batting average with 10 home runs and 50 RBI were enough to earn him second place in the NL Rookie of the Year voting in ’91.
  • Second Base: Jose Lind. The previous season, Lind logged his fourth consecutive 150-game campaign while hitting a solid .265.
  • Shortstop: Jay Bell. Showing plenty of pop for a middle infielder, Bell cracked 16 homers in ’91.
  • Third Base: Steve Buechele. Acquired at the trading deadline in ’91 to bolster the offense at the corner, Buechele re-signed with the Pirates as a free agent in December.
  • Left Field: Barry Bonds The 1990 National League Most Valuabe Player should have repeated the following year, but the voters opted for the Braves’ Terry Pendleton.
  • Center Field: Andy Van Slyke. Posting a bit of an off-season in ’91, Van Slyke still drove in 83 runs.
  • Right Field: Kirk Gibson. The NL’s 1988 MVP signed with the Pirates after a 16-homer season for the Royals in ’91.

The starting rotation was missing John Smiley, traded to the Twins, but still looked decent for the long haul:

  • Doug Drabek. The 1990 NL Cy Young Award winner compiled a 15-14 record the following year, but led the team with a 3.07 ERA.
  • Zane Smith. The lefthander justified his acquisition from Montreal for Moises Alou by winning 16 games and posting a 3.20 ERA in ’91.
  • Randy Tomlin. In his first full season, Tomlin led Pirates starters in ’91 with a 2.98 ERA.
  • Bob Walk. The future Pirates broadcaster was coming off a 9-2 season.

Returning to anchor the bullpen were Stan Belinda, Bob Patterson and Roger Mason.

Fast-forward to the end of the ’92 season, when the pirates advanced to the playoffs for the third consecutive year.

Bonds carried the offense, leading the team with 34 HR, 107 RBI and 36 stolen bases while batting .311 to win MVP honors. Van Slyke hit a career-high .324, leading the league in hits and doubles. Drabek (15 wins), Tomlin (14) and Walk (10) led the rotation, joined in midseason by Danny Jackson from the Cubs and Tim Wakefield from the minors. Wakefield was particularly impressive, going 8-1 with a 2.15 ERA down the stretch.

On the other hand, Gibson lasted only 16 games before his release. Buechele gave way at third to former No. 1 draft pick Jeff King, who batted .231 with 14 HR, which tied him with Van Slyke for second on the team; only three Pirates hit more than 10 homers.

Whatever the case, the Pirates managed to carry a 2-0 lead into the ninth inning of the seventh game of the National League Championship Series. What happened next … well, everyone in Pittsburgh knows and doesn’t want to remember.

Nor does any Pirates fan want to remember what happened after 1992.

One of my favorite online resources is AllMusic.

The database, if it doesn’t literally contain all music, comes pretty darned close. It certainly is a great resource for learning about worthwhile listens.

The guide rates recordings, from 1 to 5 stars. Following is a list of the 5-star albums in my collection. Well, most of them. I didn’t delve into “various artists” collections, and there may be some single-artists compilations that I missed. But this might give you an idea of what to check out on Spotify, or if you want to actually spend money and support the various artists.

  • AC/DC: “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap”
  • Allman Brothers Band: “Idlewild South,” “At Fillmore East,” “Eat a Peach”
  • Gene Ammons: “The Happy Blues”
  • Louis Armstong: “Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy”
  • Albert Ayler: “Live in Greenwich Village: The Complete Impulse Sessions”
  • The Band: “Music from Big Pink,” “The Band”
  • The Beatles: “Please Please Me,” “With the Beatles,” “A Hard Day’s Night,” “Beatles for Sale,” “Help!,” “Rubber Soul,” “Revolver,” “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” “Magical Mystery Tour,” “The Beatles,” “Abbey Road”
  • Jeff Beck: “Truth”
  • Chuck Berry: “St. Louis to Liverpool”
  • Big Brother & the Holding Company: “Cheap Thrills”
  • Big Star: “#1 Record,” “Third/Sister Lovers”
  • Black Sabbath: “Paranoid,” “Master of Reality,” “Volume 4”
  • Blur: “Parklife”
  • David Bowie: “The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars,” “Low,” “Heroes”
  • Brinsley Schwarz: “Nervous On the Road”
  • Dave Brubeck Quartet: “Time Out”
  • Jeff Buckley: “Grace”
  • Butterfield Blues Band: “Paul Butterfield Blues Band,” “East-West”
  • The Byrds: “Sweetheart of the Rodeo”
  • Can: “Tago Mago”
  • Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band: “Safe As Milk,” “Trout Mask Replica”
  • Johnny Cash: “Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison”
  • Ray Charles: “Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music”
  • Charlie Christian: “The Genius of the Electric Guitar”
  • Eric Clapton: “Crossroads”
  • Sonny Clark: “Cool Struttin'”
  • The Clash: “The Clash,” “London Calling”
  • John Coltrane: “Blue Train,” “Bags & Trane,” “My Favorite Things,” “Duke Ellington and John Coltrane,” “John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman,” “A Love Supreme”
  • Chick Corea: “Return to Forever”
  • Elvis Costello: “My Aim Is True,” “This Year’s Model,” “Get Happy!!”
  • Creedence Clearwater Revival: “Green River,” “Willy & the Poor Boys,” “Cosmos Factory”
  • Crosby, Stills & Nash: “Crosby, Stills & Nash”
  • Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young: “Deja Vu”
  • Miles Davis: “Birth of the Cool,” “‘Round About Midnight,” “Relaxin’,” “Porgy and Bess,” “Kind of Blue,” “Sketches of Spain,” “Workin’,” “Steamin’,” “Miles Smiles,” “In a Silent Way,” “Bitches Brew,” “A Tribute to Jack Johnson,” “On the Corner”
  • Deep Purple: “Machine Head”
  • Derek & the Dominos: “Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs”
  • Dillard & Clark: “The Fantastic Expedition of Dillard & Clark”
  • Willie Dixon: “The Chess Box”
  • Eric Dolphy: “Out There,” “Out to Lunch”
  • The Doors: “The Doors”
  • Bob Dylan: “Highway 61 Revisited,” “Blonde On Blonde,” “Blood On the Tracks”
  • Bob Dylan & the Band: “The Basement Tapes”
  • Duke Ellington: “Ellington at Newport,” “… and His Mother Called Him Bill”
  • Brian Eno: “Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy),” “Another Green World”
  • Faces: “Five Guys Walk into a Bar …”
  • The Firesign Theatre: “How Can You Be in Two Places at Once When You’re Not Anywhere at All,” “Don’t Crush That Dwarf, Hand Me the Pliers”
  • The Flaming Lips: “The Soft Bulletin”
  • The Flying Burrito Brothers: “The Gilded Palace of Sin”
  • Funkdadelic: “Maggot Brain”
  • Gang of Four: “Entertainment!”
  • Erroll Garner: “Concert By the Sea”
  • Marvin Gaye: “What’s Going On”
  • Genesis: “Foxtrot”
  • Grateful Dead: “Workingman’s Dead,” “American Beauty,” “Dick’s Picks, Vol. 4”
  • Green Day: “American Idiot”
  • Herbie Hancock: “Maiden Voyage,” “Head Hunters”
  • George Harrison: “All Things Must Pass”
  • Jimi Hendrix Experience: “Are You Experienced?,” “Axis: Bold As Love,” “Electric Ladyland”
  • Howlin’ Wolf: “Howlin’ Wolf/Moanin’ in the Moonlight,” “The Chess Box”
  • Husker Du: “Zen Arcade”
  • Incredible String Band: “The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter”
  • Etta James: “At Last!”
  • Keith Jarrett: “The Koln Concert”
  • Jefferson Airplane: “Surrealistic Pillow”
  • Lonnie Johnson: “Steppin’ on the Blues”
  • Robert Johnson: “The Complete Recordings”
  • Janis Joplin: “Pearl”
  • King Crimson: “In the Court of the Crimson King”
  • Albert King: “Born Under a Bad Sign”
  • The Kinks: “Face to Face,” “Something Else by the Kinks,” “The Village Green Preservation Society”
  • Kraftwerk: “Autobahn,” “Trans-Europe Express”
  • Led Zeppelin: “Led Zeppelin,” “Led Zeppelin II,” “Led Zeppelin III,” “Physical Graffiti”
  • John Lennon: “John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band,” “Imagine”
  • Little Feat: “Little Feat”
  • Love: “Da Capo,” “Forever Changes”
  • Nick Lowe: “Jesus of Cool”
  • Magic Sam: “West Side Soul”
  • Mahavishnu Orchestra: “The Inner Mounting Flame,” “Birds of Fire”
  • Bob Marley & the Wailers: “Catch a Fire”
  • John Mayall: “Blues Breakers With Eric Clapton”
  • The MC5: “Kick Out the Jams”
  • Metallica: “Master of Puppets”
  • Pat Metheny Group: “Pat Methenhy Group”
  • Charles Mingues: “Mingus Ah Um,” “Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus”
  • The Minutemen: “Double Nickels on the Dime”
  • Moby Grape: “Moby Grape”
  • Modern Jazz Quartet: “The Complete Last Concert”
  • Wes Montgomery: “Full House”
  • Van Morrison: “Astral Weeks,” “Moondance”
  • Mothers of Invention: “Freak Out!,” “We’re Only In It for the Money”
  • Mott the Hoople: “All the Young Dudes,” “Mott”
  • The Move: “Shazam”
  • My Bloody Valentine: “Loveless”
  • Randy Newman: “12 Songs,” “Sail Away”
  • Parliament: “Mothership Connection”
  • Gram Parsons: “G.P.”
  • Joe Pass: “Virtuoso”
  • Jaco Pastorius: “Jaco Pastorius”
  • Pavement: “Slanted & Enchanted,” “Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain”
  • Pearl Jam: “Ten”
  • Pere Ubu: “Terminal Tower”
  • Pink Floyd: “The Piper at the Gates of Dawn,” “The Dark Side of the Moon,” “Wish You Were Here”
  • Iggy Pop: “The Idiot,” “Lust for Life”
  • The Quintet: “Jazz at Massey Hall”
  • The Replacements: “Let It Be”
  • The Rolling Stones: “Between the Buttons,” “Beggars Banquet,” “Let It Bleed, “Sticky Fingers,” “Exile on Main St.,” “Some Girls,” “Singles Collection: The London Years,” “Forty Licks”
  • Sonny Rollins: “Sonny Rollins Plus 4,” “Saxophone Colossus,” “Way Out West”
  • Todd Rundgren: “Something/Anything?”
  • Pharoah Sanders: “Karma”
  • Santana: “Abraxas”
  • Klaus Schulze: “Moondawn”
  • Gil Scott-Heron: “Small Talk at 125th and Lenox”
  • The Sex Pistols: “Never Mind the Bollocks”
  • Sonny Sharrock: “Ask the Ages”
  • Wayne Shorter: “Speak No Evil”
  • Horace Silver: “Song for My Father”
  • Paul Simon: “Paul Simon,” “There Goes Rhymin’ Simon”
  • Skin Alley: “To Pagham & Beyond”
  • Sly & the Family Stone: “Stand!,” “There’s a Riot Goin’ On”
  • Small Faces: “The Darlings of Wapping Wharf Launderette”
  • Patti Smith: “Horses”
  • The Soft Boys: “Underwater Moonlight”
  • Sonic Youth: “Sister,” “Daydream Nation”
  • The Stooges: “Fun House,” “Raw Power”
  • Sun Ra: “Atlantis,” “Space Is the Place”
  • Talking Heads: “Talking Heads 77,” “More Songs About Buildings and Food,” “Remain In Light”
  • Hound Dog Taylor: “Hound Dog Taylor & the Houserockers”
  • Television: “Marquee Moon”
  • Thin Lizzy: “Jailbreak”
  • Richard & Linda Thompson: “Shoot Out the Lights”
  • Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble: “Texas Flood”
  • Velvet Underground: “The Velvet Underground & Nico,” “White Light/White Heat,” “The Velvet Underground,” “Loaded”
  • The Wailers: “Burnin'”
  • T-Bone Walker: “The Complete Imperial Recordings: 1950-1954”
  • Muddy Waters: “At Newport,” “The Chess Box”
  • Weather Report: “Heavy Weather”
  • The White Stripes: “Elephant”
  • The Who: “The Who Sings My Generation,” “The Who Sell Out,” “Live at Leeds,” “Who’s Next”
  • Tony Williams’ Lifetime: “Emergency!”
  • Wire: “Pink Flag,” “Chairs Missing”
  • Stevie Wonder: “Talking Book,” “Innervisions,” “Songs in the Key of Life”
  • Link Wray: “Rumble!”
  • X: “Los Angeles,” “Under the Big Black Sun”
  • Yes: “Fragile,” “Close to the Edge”
  • Neil Young: “On the Beach,” “Rust Never Sleeps”

By the way, I’ve been working on this list for a couple of weeks during some “down time.” And it’s been a lot of fun! Gotta listen to some of these albums again in the near future.

I’ve posted my interview with the Carnegie Museum of Art fine arts curator involving “Teenie Harris, Photographer: An American Story,” the exhibition at the library through April 7.

Click here if you’re interested in seeing the resulting video. Louise, the curator, does a great job of explaining what the exhibition is all about.

And by all means, visit! I plan to go back when I have the opportunity to spend, oh, like all day there.

The other day I had the honor of interviewing Louise Lippincott, curator of fine arts for the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh.

The topic was the exhibition “Teenie Harris, Photographer: An American Story,” which runs through April 7 at the museum. Louise spoke at length about the project, and I used her narrative for a video showing Mr. Harris’ work.

I’d heard of Teenie Harris long ago through his work with the Pittsburgh Courier shooting the Homestead Grays, Pittsburgh Crawfords and other Negro League teams. Later, when I moved to Western Pennsylvania, I lerned more about him and came to respect him as a pre-eminent chronicler of history.

If you live within driving distance of The Carnegie, or even beyond, you’ll do yourself a favor by visiting the exhibition. And plan to stay for a long while.

I’ll be posting my video on Monday, in commemoration of Martin Luther King Day, as Dr. King was the subject of quite a few of Mr. Harris’ photos.

Associated listening: “The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society” (1968)

Shout out: I received word from my Twitter buddy and fellow journalist Lici from Mississippi that she’d mentioned me in her newspaper column. Thanks, Lici!!!
We are encouraging each other to blog more consistently in the New Year! Her blog is Ramblin’ Prose, and I highly encourage you to check out her work. ‘Cause Lici is a much better writer.

The first year I really remember listening to the radio was the one that opened my second decade of my life. Some of my memories include John Lennon’s “Instant Karma!”, Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Down on the Corner” and the Guess Who’s “No Sugar Tonight.”

It turned out to be another good year for my music collection, as well:

  • “Idlewild South” by the Allman Brothers Band
  • “Yeti” by Amon Duul II
  • “Atomic Roooster” [sic] by Atomic Rooster
  • “Death Walks Behind You” by Atomic Rooster
  • “Stage Fright” by The Band
  • “The Madcap Laughs” by Syd Barrett
  • “Barrett” by Syd Barrett
  • “Let It Be” by the Beatles
  • “Paranoid” by Black Sabbath
  • “McLemore Avenue” by Booker T. & the MG’s
  • “Brinsley Schwarz” by Brinsley Schwarz
  • “Despite It All” by Brinsley Schwarz
  • “Sing Brother Sing” by the Edgar Broughton Band
  • “Untitled” by the Byrds
  • “Lick My Decals Off, Baby” by Captain Beefheart & the Magic Band
  • “Chicago” by Chicago
  • “Easy Action” by Alice Cooper
  • “Cosmo’s Factory” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
  • “Pendulum” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
  • “Deja Vu” by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young
  • “Bitches Brew” by Miles Davis
  • “Miles Davis at Fillmore: Live at the Fillmore East” by Miles Davis
  • “Black Beauty: Miles Davis at Fillmore West
  • “Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs” by Derek & the Dominos
  • “Morrison Hotel – Hard Rock Cafe” by the Doors
  • “New Morning” by Bob Dylan
  • “Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits, Vol. 2” by Bob Dylan
  • “Don’t Crush That Dwarf, Hand Me the Pliers” by the Firesign Theatre
  • “Kiln House” by Fleetwood Mac
  • “In and Out of Focus” by Focus
  • “Free Your Mind … and Your Ass Will Follow” by Funkadelic
  • “Gentle Giant” by Gentle Giant
  • “Eight Miles High” by Golden Earring
  • “Workingman’s Dead” by the Grateful Dead
  • “American Beauty” by the Grateful Dead
  • “Thank Christ for the Bomb” by the Groundhogs
  • “UFO” by Guru Guru
  • “All Things Must Pass” by George Harrison
  • “The Battle of North West Six” by the Keef Hartley Band
  • “Hawkwind” by Hawkwind
  • “Band of Gypsys” by Jimi Hendrix
  • “High Tide” by High Tide
  • “Hot Tuna” by Hot Tuna
  • “The James Gang Rides Again” by the James Gang
  • “Blows Against the Empire” by Paul Kantner/Jefferson Starship
  • “In the Wake of Poseidon” by King Crimson
  • “Lizard” by King Crimson
  • “Indianola Mississippi Seeds” by B.B. King
  • “Lola vs. the Powerman & the Money-Go-Round, Pt. 1” by the Kinks
  • “Led Zeppelin III” by Led Zeppelin
  • “John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band” by John Lennon
  • “USA Union” by John Mayall
  • “Back in the USA” by the MC5
  • “Moondance” by Van Morrison
  • “Burnt Weeny Sandwich” by the Mothers of Invention
  • “Weasels Ripped My Flesh” by the Mothers of Invention
  • “Climbing!” by Mountain
  • “Shazam” by the Move
  • “Looking On” by the Move
  • “Nazz III” by the Nazz
  • “12 Songs” by Randy Newman
  • “Here Comes Shuggie Otis” by Shuggie Otis
  • “Osmium” by Parliament
  • “Atom Heart Mother” by Pink Floyd
  • “King Kong: Jean-Luc Ponty Plays the Music of Frank Zappa” by Jean-Luc Ponty
  • “Parachute” by the Pretty Things
  • “Home” by Procol Harum
  • “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out” by the Rolling Stones
  • “Abraxas” by Santana
  • “Raw Sienna” by Savoy Brown
  • “Looking In” by Savoy Brown
  • “Small Talk at 125th and Lenox” by Gil-Scott Heron
  • “Seatrain” by Seatrain
  • “Kingdom Come” by Sir Lord Baltimore
  • “Skin Alley” by Skin Alley
  • “To Pagham and Beyond” by Skin Alley
  • “Third” by Soft Machine
  • “Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus” by Spirit
  • “Fun House” by the Stooges
  • “Just for You” by Sweetwater
  • “Electronic Meditation” by Tangerine Dream
  • “John Barleycorn Must Die” by Traffic
  • “Think Pink” by Twink
  • “The Least We Can Do Is Wave to Each Other” by Van der Graaf Generator
  • “H to He, Who Am the Only One” by Van der Graaf Generator
  • “Loaded” by the Velvet Underground
  • “Album I” by Loudon Wainwright III
  • “Live at Leeds” by The Who
  • “Johnny Winter And” by Johnny Winter
  • “Wishbone Ash” by Wishbone Ash
  • “Time and a Word” by Yes
  • “Chunga’s Revenge” by Frank Zappa

Associated listening: “Fun House” by the Stooges

I can’t admit to listening to a lot of what eventually became known as classic rock when I actually was alive during the ’60s. I wasn’t that old when the decade ended, and I certainly didn’t hear any of that type of music through my parents. My dad still is pretty much convinced that anything recorded after World War II is “noise.”

Through a convergence of circumstances, by roughy 1976 I was exploring the music of the previous decade, while my classmates were listening to disco and the like. I remember the stares I got when I brought “The Worst of Jefferson Airplane” to listen to in typing class. Even the teacher, Mr. Wolf, felt compelled to comment.

No matter. They call it classic rock, not classic disco.

At any rate, my music collection from the past 35 years or so is widely varied, but a lot of it does lean toward a certain genre from a certain era. And I think the final year of the ’60s leads the way.

Here’s a sampling of what fans were lucky enough to hear when it came out new in 1969:

  • “The Allman Brothers Band” by the Allman Brothers Band
  • “Phallus Dei” by Amon Duul II
  • “Andromeda” by Andromeda
  • “Argent” by Argent
  • “Arzachel” by Arzachel
  • “The Band” by The Band
  • “Yellow Submarine” by the Beatles
  • “Abbey Road” by the Beatles
  • “Beck-Ola” by the Jeff Beck Group
  • “Blind Faith” by Blind Faith
  • “It’s Not Killing Me” by Michael Bloomfield
  • “Live at Bill Graham’s Fillmore West: 1969” by Michael Bloomfield
  • “New! Improved!” by Blue Cheer
  • “Wasa Wasa” by the Edgar Broughton Band
  • “Ballad of Easy Rider” by the Byrds
  • “Monster Movie” by Can
  • “Trout Mask Replica” by Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band
  • “The Charlatans” by the Charlatans
  • “Chicago Transit Authority” by Chicago Transit Authority
  • “Penitentiary Blues” by David Allan Coe
  • “Valentyne Suite” by Colosseum
  • “Bayou Country” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
  • “Green River” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
  • “Willy & the Poor Boys” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
  • “Crosby, Stills & Nash” by Crosby, Stills & Nash
  • “In a Silent Way” by Miles Davis
  • “The Book of Taliesyn” by Deep Purple
  • “Deep Purple” by Deep Purple
  • “Concerto for Group and Orchestra” by Deep Purple
  • “On Tour With Eric Clapton” by Delaney & Bonnie & Friends
  • “Through the Morning, Through the Night” by Dillard & Clark
  • “The Great American Eagle Tragedy” by Earth Opera
  • “How Can You Be in Two Places at Once When You’re Not Anywhere at All” by the Firesign Theatre
  • “Then Play On” by Fleetwood Mac
  • “The Gilded Palace of Sin” by the Flying Burrito Bros.
  • “Free” by Free
  • “Aoxomoxoa” by the Grateful Dead
  • “Live/Dead” by the Grateful Dead
  • “My Labors” by Nick Gravenites
  • “Blues Obituary” by the Groundhogs
  • “Canned Wheat” by the Guess Who
  • “Halfbreed” by the Keef Hartley Band
  • “Sea Shanties” by High Tide
  • “Two Bugs and a Roach” by Earl Hooker
  • “Yer Album” by the James Gang
  • “Bless Its Pointed Little Head” by Jefferson Airplane
  • “Volunteers” by Jefferson Airplane
  • “Stand Up” by Jethro Tull
  • “I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama!” by Janis Joplin
  • “In the Court of the Crimson King” by King Crimson
  • “Led Zeppelin” by Led Zeppelin
  • “Led Zeppelin II” by Led Zeppelin
  • “Four Sail” by Love
  • “Forms and Feelings” by Love Sculpture
  • “Paradise Bar & Grill” by Mad River
  • “Revelation” by Man
  • “2 Ozs. Of Plastic with a Hole in the Middle” by Man
  • “The Turning Point” by John Mayall
  • “Kick Out the Jams” by the MC5
  • “Brave New World” by the Steve Miller Band
  • “Your Saving Grace” by the Steve Miller Band
  • “On the Threshold of a Dream” by the Moody Blues
  • “Astral Weeks” by Van Morrison
  • “Uncle Meat” by the Mothers of Invention
  • “Mott the Hoople” by Mott the Hoople
  • “Sunshine” by Sunny Murray
  • “An Even Break (Never Give a Sucker)” by Sunny Murray
  • “Nazz Nazz” by the Nazz
  • “Accent on the Blues” by John Patton
  • “Soundtrack from the Film ‘More'” by Pink Floyd
  • “Ummagumma” by Pink Floyd
  • “A Salty Dog” by Procol Harum
  • “Happy Trails” by Quicksilver Messenger Service
  • “Shady Grove” by Quicksilver Messenger Service
  • “Get Ready” by Rare Earth
  • “Renaissance” by Renaissance
  • “Let It Bleed” by the Rolling Stones
  • “Karma” by Pharaoh Sanders
  • “Santana” by Santana
  • “Mendocino” by the Sir Douglas Quintet
  • “Loosen Up Naturally” by Sons of Champlin
  • “Oar” by Alexander Spence
  • “The Family That Plays Together” by Spirit
  • “Spooky Two” by Spooky Tooth
  • “Red Weather” by Leigh Stephens
  • “Monster” by Steppenwolf
  • “The Stooges” by the Stooges
  • “Atlantis” by Sun Ra
  • “Hollywood Dream” by Thunderclap Newman
  • “The Aerosol Grey Machine” by Van der Graaf Generator
  • “The Velvet Underground” by the Velvet Underground
  • “Tommy” by The Who
  • “Emergency!” by Tony Williams’ Lifetime
  • “The Progressive Blues Experiment” by Johnny Winter
  • “Johnny Winter” by Johnny Winter
  • “Second Winter” by Johnny Winter
  • “Yes” by Yes
  • “Hot Rats” by Frank Zappa

Associated listening: “The Stooges” by the Stooges